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McAfee Labs Threats Report Examines Cybercriminal Underground, IoT Malware, Other Threats

The McAfee Advanced Threat Research team today published the McAfee® Labs Threats Report, December 2018. In this edition, we highlight the notable investigative research and trends in threats statistics and observations gathered by the McAfee Advanced Threat Research and McAfee Labs teams in Q3 of 2018.

We are very excited to present to you new insights and a new format in this report. We are dedicated to listening to our customers to determine what you find important and how we can add value. In recent months we have gathered more threat intelligence, correlating and analyzing data to provide more useful insights into what is happening in the evolving threat landscape. McAfee is collaborating closely with MITRE Corporation in extending the techniques of its MITRE ATT&CK™ knowledge base, and we now include the model in our report. We are always working to refine our process and reports. You can expect more from us, and we welcome your feedback.

As we dissect the threat landscape for Q3, some noticeable statistics jump out of the report.  In particular, the continued rise in cryptojacking, which has made an unexpected emergence over the course of a year. In Q3 the growth of coin miner malware returned to unprecedented levels after a temporary slowdown in Q2.

Our analysis of recent threats included one notable introduction in a disturbing category. In Q3 we saw two new exploit kits: Fallout and Underminer. Fallout almost certainly had a bearing on the spread of GandCrab, the leading ransomware. Five years ago we published the report “Cybercrime Exposed,” which detailed the rise of cybercrime as a service. Exploit kits are the epitome of this economy, affording anyone the opportunity to easily and cheaply enter the digital crime business.

New malware samples jumped up again in Q3 after a decline during the last two quarters. Although the upward trend applies to almost every category, we did measure a decline in new mobile malware samples following three quarters of continual growth.

This post is only a small snapshot of the comprehensive analysis provided in the December Threats Report. We hope you enjoy the new format, and we welcome your feedback.

The post McAfee Labs Threats Report Examines Cybercriminal Underground, IoT Malware, Other Threats appeared first on McAfee Blogs.

Posted: 18 Dec 2018 | 9:01 pm

Houston, we've had a problem: NASA fears internal server hacked, staff personal info swiped by miscreants

Another leak, this time it's personal. Plus: Trump launches Space Force, er, Command

A server containing personal information, including social security numbers, of current and former NASA workers may have been hacked, and its data stolen, it emerged today.…

Posted: 18 Dec 2018 | 3:32 pm

After SamSam, Ryuk shows targeted ransomware is still evolving

Devastating, targeted ransomware attacks didn't start with SamSam and they didn't end with it either.

Posted: 18 Dec 2018 | 10:48 am

URSNIF, EMOTET, DRIDEX and BitPaymer Gangs Linked by a Similar Loader

As ransomware and banking trojans captured the interest – and profits – of the world with their destructive routines, cybersecurity practitioners have repeatedly published online and offline how cybercriminals have compartmentalized their schemes through exchange of information and banded professional organizations. As a more concrete proof of the way these symbiotic relationships and work flows intersect, we discovered a connection between EMOTET, URSNIF, DRIDEX and BitPaymer from open source information and the loaders of the samples we had, functioning as if tasks were divided among different developers and operators.

Figure 1. Connections of EMOTET, DRIDEX, URSNIF and BitPaymer.

 

Background and details

In order to have a better understanding of the significance of these connections, here’s a summarized background of each malware family:

Still considered as one of the global top threats, this banking trojan’s source code was among those repeatedly leaked because of its evolution and notoriety for adaptive behaviors. This spyware monitors traffic, features a keylogger, and steals credentials stored in browsers and applications. The malware creators of GOZI admitted to its creation and distribution, and was sentenced in 2015 and 2016.

Another banking trojan that targets banking and financial institutions, the cybercriminals behind it use various methods and techniques to steal personal information and credentials through malicious attachments and HTML injections. DRIDEX evolved from CRIDEX, GameOver Zeus and ZBOT, and proved to be resilient even after it was momentarily taken down in 2015 through a partnership with the FBI.

Discovered by Trend Micro in 2014, this malware acts as a loader for payloads such as Gootkit, ZeusPanda, IcedID, TrickBot, and DRIDEX for critical attacks. Other publications have also mentioned observing obfuscation techniques between EMOTET and URSNIF/GOZI-ISFB.

This ransomware was used to target medical institutions via remote desktop protocol and other email-related techniques, momentarily shutting down routine services for a high ransom. Security researchers later published evidence that not only was DRIDEX dropping BitPaymer, but that it also came from the same cybercriminal group.

During our analysis, we found evidence that the malware families identified had shared loaders: the overview of the payload decryption procedure, and the loaders’ internal data structure. While the first figure of the disassembled PE packers had small differences in their arithmetic operations’ instructions, we found that the four payload decryption procedures were identical in data structures’ overview on the way they decrypted the actual PE payloads.

Figure 2. Overview of identical structures of payloads’ loader decryption procedures.

Further analysis also revealed that the internal data structure of the four malware families were the same. We compared the disassembled codes from the samples we had and noticed the encrypted payload address and size placed into the decryption procedure located at offset 0x34 and 0x38.

Figure 3. Identical data structures show similar payload addresses and sizes.

Figure 4. Data structure used by the shared loader.

As cybercrime organizational structures in some countries tend to compartmentalize work, we suspect that the four malware families’ gangs might be in contact with the same weapon providers for PE loaders. In addition, it’s also possible that these four cybercrime groups may establish some attributional – working or otherwise – relationships and have exchanged or continue to exchange resources.

In our history of monitoring botnets and the underground organizations who make and/or use them, the cybercriminals behind EMOTET may be sharing to collaborate with trusted, highly-skilled cybercriminal groups, and may be a sign of these four groups’ ongoing and intriguing relationship.

Alliances like these could lead to more destructive malware deployments in the future. More than ever, it is important for organizations to heighten cybersecurity preventive measures, such as establishing policies and procedures for handling security threats. Regular education awareness sessions and reminders for employees can help protect the enterprise from attacks and intrusions from malicious emails and URLs. Installing and updating a multi-layered protection and solution in preventing online banking threats can go a long way in securing businesses.

Trend Micro Solutions

Trend Micro endpoint solutions such as the Smart Protection Suites and Worry-Free Business Security solutions can protect users and businesses from threats by detecting malicious files and messages as well as blocking all related malicious URLs. Trend Micro™ Deep Discovery™ has an email inspection layer that can protect enterprises by detecting malicious attachments and URLs.

Trend Micro XGen™ security provides a cross-generational blend of threat defense techniques to protect systems from all types of threats, including ransomware and cryptocurrency-mining malware. It features high-fidelity machine learning on gateways and endpoints, and protects physical, virtual, and cloud workloads. With capabilities like web/URL filtering, behavioral analysis, and custom sandboxing, XGen security can secure systems against modern threats that bypass traditional controls; exploit known, unknown, or undisclosed vulnerabilities; either steal or encrypt personally identifiable data; or conduct malicious cryptocurrency mining. Smart, optimized, and connected, XGen security powers Trend Micro’s suite.

Indicators of Compromise

Malware

SHA256

URSNIF 9d38a0220b2dfb353fc34d03079f2ba2c7de1d4a234f6a2b06365bfc1870cd89
DRIDEX cbd130b4b714c9bb0a62e45b2e07f3ab20a6db3abd1899aa3ec21f402d25779e
EMOTET 0a47f5b274e803754ce84ebd66599eb35795fb851f55062ff042e73e2b9d5763
BitPaymer d693c33dd550529f3634e3c7e53d82df70c9d4fbd0c339dbc1849ada9e539ea2

The post URSNIF, EMOTET, DRIDEX and BitPaymer Gangs Linked by a Similar Loader appeared first on .

Posted: 18 Dec 2018 | 4:51 am

Introducing Reneo

Reneo is a Windows tool to help incident responders, forensics specialists, and security researchers analyze and reverse engineer malicious and obfuscated scripts and other content. This tool can convert from/to various formats, transform, deobfuscate, encode/decode, encrypt/decrypt, and hash strings. The … Continue reading

Posted: 27 Jun 2018 | 8:14 am

Rootkit Umbreon / Umreon - x86, ARM samples



Pokémon-themed Umbreon Linux Rootkit Hits x86, ARM Systems
Research: Trend Micro


There are two packages
one is 'found in the wild' full and a set of hashes from Trend Micro (all but one file are already in the full package)






Download

Download Email me if you need the password  



File information

Part one (full package)

#File NameHash ValueFile Size (on Disk)Duplicate?
1.umbreon-ascii0B880E0F447CD5B6A8D295EFE40AFA376085 bytes (5.94 KiB)
2autoroot1C5FAEEC3D8C50FAC589CD0ADD0765C7281 bytes (281 bytes)
3CHANGELOGA1502129706BA19667F128B44D19DC3C11 bytes (11 bytes)
4cli.shC846143BDA087783B3DC6C244C2707DC5682 bytes (5.55 KiB)
5hideportsD41D8CD98F00B204E9800998ECF8427E0 bytes ( bytes)Yes, of file promptlog
6install.sh9DE30162E7A8F0279E19C2C30280FFF85634 bytes (5.5 KiB)
7Makefile0F5B1E70ADC867DD3A22CA62644007E5797 bytes (797 bytes)
8portchecker006D162A0D0AA294C85214963A3D3145113 bytes (113 bytes)
9promptlogD41D8CD98F00B204E9800998ECF8427E0 bytes ( bytes)
10readlink.c42FC7D7E2F9147AB3C18B0C4316AD3D81357 bytes (1.33 KiB)
11ReadMe.txtB7172B364BF5FB8B5C30FF528F6C51252244 bytes (2.19 KiB)
12setup694FFF4D2623CA7BB8270F5124493F37332 bytes (332 bytes)
13spytty.sh0AB776FA8A0FBED2EF26C9933C32E97C1011 bytes (1011 bytes)Yes, of file spytty.sh
14umbreon.c91706EF9717176DBB59A0F77FE95241C1007 bytes (1007 bytes)
15access.c7C0A86A27B322E63C3C29121788998B8713 bytes (713 bytes)
16audit.cA2B2812C80C93C9375BFB0D7BFCEFD5B1434 bytes (1.4 KiB)
17chown.cFF9B679C7AB3F57CFBBB852A13A350B22870 bytes (2.8 KiB)
18config.h980DEE60956A916AFC9D2997043D4887967 bytes (967 bytes)
19config.h.dist980DEE60956A916AFC9D2997043D4887967 bytes (967 bytes)Yes, of file config.h
20dirs.c46B20CC7DA2BDB9ECE65E36A4F987ABC3639 bytes (3.55 KiB)
21dlsym.c796DA079CC7E4BD7F6293136604DC07B4088 bytes (3.99 KiB)
22exec.c1935ED453FB83A0A538224AFAAC71B214033 bytes (3.94 KiB)
23getpath.h588603EF387EB617668B00EAFDAEA393183 bytes (183 bytes)
24getprocname.hF5781A9E267ED849FD4D2F5F3DFB8077805 bytes (805 bytes)
25includes.hF4797AE4B2D5B3B252E0456020F58E59629 bytes (629 bytes)
26kill.cC4BD132FC2FFBC84EA5103ABE6DC023D555 bytes (555 bytes)
27links.c898D73E1AC14DE657316F084AADA58A02274 bytes (2.22 KiB)
28local-door.c76FC3E9E2758BAF48E1E9B442DB98BF8501 bytes (501 bytes)
29lpcap.hEA6822B23FE02041BE506ED1A182E5CB1690 bytes (1.65 KiB)
30maps.c9BCD90BEA8D9F9F6270CF2017F9974E21100 bytes (1.07 KiB)
31misc.h1F9FCC5D84633931CDD77B32DB1D50D02728 bytes (2.66 KiB)
32netstat.c00CF3F7E7EA92E7A954282021DD72DC41113 bytes (1.09 KiB)
33open.cF7EE88A523AD2477FF8EC17C9DCD7C028594 bytes (8.39 KiB)
34pam.c7A947FDC0264947B2D293E1F4D69684A2010 bytes (1.96 KiB)
35pam_private.h2C60F925842CEB42FFD639E7C763C7B012480 bytes (12.19 KiB)
36pam_vprompt.c017FB0F736A0BC65431A25E1A9D393FE3826 bytes (3.74 KiB)
37passwd.cA0D183BBE86D05E3782B5B24E2C964132364 bytes (2.31 KiB)
38pcap.cFF911CA192B111BD0D9368AFACA03C461295 bytes (1.26 KiB)
39procstat.c7B14E97649CD767C256D4CD6E4F8D452398 bytes (398 bytes)
40procstatus.c72ED74C03F4FAB0C1B801687BE200F063303 bytes (3.23 KiB)
41readwrite.cC068ED372DEAF8E87D0133EAC0A274A82710 bytes (2.65 KiB)
42rename.cC36BE9C01FEADE2EF4D5EA03BD2B3C05535 bytes (535 bytes)
43setgid.c5C023259F2C244193BDA394E2C0B8313667 bytes (667 bytes)
44sha256.h003D805D919B4EC621B800C6C239BAE0545 bytes (545 bytes)
45socket.c348AEF06AFA259BFC4E943715DB5A00B579 bytes (579 bytes)
46stat.cE510EE1F78BD349E02F47A7EB001B0E37627 bytes (7.45 KiB)
47syslog.c7CD3273E09A6C08451DD598A0F18B5701497 bytes (1.46 KiB)
48umbreon.hF76CAC6D564DEACFC6319FA167375BA54316 bytes (4.21 KiB)
49unhide-funcs.c1A9F62B04319DA84EF71A1B091434C644729 bytes (4.62 KiB)
50cryptpass.py2EA92D6EC59D85474ED7A91C8518E7EC192 bytes (192 bytes)
51environment.sh70F467FE218E128258D7356B7CE328F11086 bytes (1.06 KiB)
52espeon-connect.shA574C885C450FCA048E79AD6937FED2E247 bytes (247 bytes)
53espeon-shell9EEF7E7E3C1BEE2F8591A088244BE0CB2167 bytes (2.12 KiB)
54espeon.c499FF5CF81C2624B0C3B0B7E9C6D980D14899 bytes (14.55 KiB)
55listen.sh69DA525AEA227BE9E4B8D59ACFF4D717209 bytes (209 bytes)
56spytty.sh0AB776FA8A0FBED2EF26C9933C32E97C1011 bytes (1011 bytes)
57ssh-hidden.shAE54F343FE974302F0D31776B72D0987127 bytes (127 bytes)
58unfuck.c457B6E90C7FA42A7C46D464FBF1D68E2384 bytes (384 bytes)
59unhide-self.pyB982597CEB7274617F286CA80864F499986 bytes (986 bytes)
60listen.shF5BD197F34E3D0BD8EA28B182CCE7270233 bytes (233 bytes)

part 2 (those listed in the Trend Micro article)
#File NameHash ValueFile Size (on Disk)
1015a84eb1d18beb310e7aeeceab8b84776078935c45924b3a10aa884a93e28acA47E38464754289C0F4A55ED7BB556489375 bytes (9.16 KiB)
20751cf716ea9bc18e78eb2a82cc9ea0cac73d70a7a74c91740c95312c8a9d53aF9BA2429EAE5471ACDE820102C5B81597512 bytes (7.34 KiB)
30a4d5ffb1407d409a55f1aed5c5286d4f31fe17bc99eabff64aa1498c5482a5f0AB776FA8A0FBED2EF26C9933C32E97C1011 bytes (1011 bytes)
40ce8c09bb6ce433fb8b388c369d7491953cf9bb5426a7bee752150118616d8ffB982597CEB7274617F286CA80864F499986 bytes (986 bytes)
5122417853c1eb1868e429cacc499ef75cfc018b87da87b1f61bff53e9b8e86709EEF7E7E3C1BEE2F8591A088244BE0CB2167 bytes (2.12 KiB)
6409c90ecd56e9abcb9f290063ec7783ecbe125c321af3f8ba5dcbde6e15ac64aB4746BB5E697F23A5842ABCAED36C9146149 bytes (6 KiB)
74fc4b5dab105e03f03ba3ec301bab9e2d37f17a431dee7f2e5a8dfadcca4c234D0D97899131C29B3EC9AE89A6D49A23E65160 bytes (63.63 KiB)
88752d16e32a611763eee97da6528734751153ac1699c4693c84b6e9e4fb08784E7E82D29DFB1FC484ED277C70218781855564 bytes (54.26 KiB)
9991179b6ba7d4aeabdf463118e4a2984276401368f4ab842ad8a5b8b730885222B1863ACDC0068ED5D50590CF792DF057664 bytes (7.48 KiB)
10a378b85f8f41de164832d27ebf7006370c1fb8eda23bb09a3586ed29b5dbdddfA977F68C59040E40A822C384D1CEDEB6176 bytes (176 bytes)
11aa24deb830a2b1aa694e580c5efb24f979d6c5d861b56354a6acb1ad0cf9809bDF320ED7EE6CCF9F979AEFE451877FFC26 bytes (26 bytes)
12acfb014304b6f2cff00c668a9a2a3a9cbb6f24db6d074a8914dd69b43afa452584D552B5D22E40BDA23E6587B1BC532D6852 bytes (6.69 KiB)
13c80d19f6f3372f4cc6e75ae1af54e8727b54b51aaf2794fedd3a1aa463140480087DD79515D37F7ADA78FF5793A42B7B11184 bytes (10.92 KiB)
14e9bce46584acbf59a779d1565687964991d7033d63c06bddabcfc4375c5f1853BBEB18C0C3E038747C78FCAB3E0444E371940 bytes (70.25 KiB)

Posted: 20 Mar 2018 | 6:29 am

Equifax breach could be most costly in corporate history

NEW YORK/TORONTO (Reuters) – Equifax Inc (EFX.N) said it expects costs related to its massive 2017 data breach to surge by $275 million this year, suggesting the incident at the credit reporting bureau could turn out to be the most costly hack in corporate history.

The projection, which was disclosed on a Friday morning earnings conference call, is on top of $164 million in pretax costs posted in the second half of 2017. That brings expected breach-related costs through the end of this year to $439 million, some $125 million of which Equifax said will be covered by insurance.

“It looks like this will be the most expensive data breach in history,” said Larry Ponemon, chairman of Ponemon Institute, a research group that tracks costs of cyber attacks.

Total costs of the breach, which compromised sensitive data of some 247 million consumers, could be“well over $600 million,” after including costs to resolve government investigations into the incident and civil lawsuits against the firm, he said.

The post Equifax breach could be most costly in corporate history appeared first on CyberESI.

Posted: 2 Mar 2018 | 11:37 am

Freedome VPN For Mac OS X

Take a look at this:

F-Secure Freedome Mac OS X

F-Secure Freedome for OS X (freshly installed on a Labs Mac Team MacBook).

Mac_Team_Test_Machines

The beta is now open for everyone to try for 60 days at no cost.

Download or share.

On 24/04/15 At 12:37 PM

Posted: 24 Apr 2015 | 1:37 am